Immunization Schedule for Infants, Pregnant Women and Children

Immunization Schedule for Infants: Getting a vaccination is one of the most important things you can do to keep your family safe. Most vaccines protect against disease and help build a strong immune system, so they’re a great investment in health and safety. However, getting immunized isn’t always easy, especially when it comes to infants, pregnant women, or children. That’s why knowing the immunization schedule for infants, pregnant women, and children can be essential. Read to find out what the immunization schedule for newborns is, why it’s so important for babies, and how to make an informed decision about vaccinating your little one.

Immunization Schedule The immune system of a person is boosted against an infection through vaccination, which is a procedure. This is achieved by exposing the immune system to foreign materials that cause it to produce a protecting response. When they acquire an infection more than once, they may develop immunity to certain common infections.

Immunization Schedule for Infants

When the same infection attempts to enter the body again, the Immunization Schedule for Infants system responds more quickly and effectively due to a memory created by immune cells in the individual. As a result, the illness cannot spread for a second time. Natural immunization, or natural immunity, is what it’s called. When someone is exposed to foreign particles purposefully, it is referred to as artificial immunization. Several vaccines against common and deadly illnesses are based on this principle.

However, Immunization Schedule for Infants many diseases carry serious complications and getting infected with them can lead to major problems in individuals. Artificial immunizations are considered as less risky and an easier method to develop immunity against a disease. Immunizations are started in babies and children as they have a weaker immunity than adults.

Immunization Schedule for Infants

Immunization Schedule for Infants Overview

Name Of Article Immunization Schedule for Infants, Pregnant Women and Children
Year 2023
Category Health
Official Website Click Also

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Immunization

Immunization is based on the idea that every person’s immune system retains a record of its first encounter with a ailment. Memory cells in the immune system recall the presence of foreign bodies. As a result, the memory cells aid in the production of antibodies against these foreign bodies when they come into touch with the person again.

This assists the individual in fighting the illness and prevents it from spreading. Because of the presence of antibodies, if infection does occur, it has no serious consequences for the individual. Polio, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Chickenpox, and Tetanus are all preventable by vaccination. Polio has been eradicated from many countries due to large-scale vaccination drives conducted by different nations. In countries where vaccination drives are not as strong, it is still prevalent. The vaccination schedules for newborns, children, and pregnant women will be discussed in the article below.

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Types of Immunization

There are two main types of immunization which are used in order to form different vaccines. These types are explained below.

  1. Active Immunization-Certain components of a microbe, or a smaller one that has been weakened, are introduced into the person’s body. These activate the body’s immune system, causing it to produce antibodies against the microbe. When the individual comes into touch with the microbe again, these Memory Cells are created, which may produce additional antibodies.
  2. Passive Immunization- In this type, pre-synthesized antibodies are transferred to the body of the person in order to give immunity to the person. This type of immunity works rapidly however it does not last long as the antibodies get broken down naturally.

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Immunization Schedule for Infants

Since their immune systems are not fully developed, the newborns should begin receiving immunization doses as soon as feasible. Breast milk provides them with just a little protection. The table below shows the recommended immunization schedule for newborns.

Vaccine Disease When to Administer
BCG Tuberculosis At birth
Hepatitis B Hepatitis B Within 24 Hours of Birth
OPV-0 Polio Within 15 Days of Birth
OPV- 1, 2, 3 Polio At 6, 10 and 14 Weeks respectively.
Pentavalent 1, 2, 3 Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Hib At 6, 10 and 14 Weeks respectively. Can be given till the age of 1 year.
Rotavirus Rotavirus At 6, 10 and 14 Weeks respectively. Can be given till the age of 1 year
IPV Polio At 6 and 14 Weeks
MMR Measles, Mumps and Rubella 9 to 12 Months
JE-1 Japanese Encephalitis 9 to 12 Months
Vitamin A Measles and Supplementation Along with MMR Vaccine

Immunization Schedule for Pregnant Women

To avoid any incurable illness during their pregnancy and delivery, pregnant women should be given vaccine doses. If they acquire any of these illnesses during pregnancy, it might harm the developing fetus and even induce complications. The following immunization regimen should be administered to pregnant women.

Vaccine Disease When to Administer
TT-1 Tetanus Early in Pregnancy
TT-2 Tetanus 4 Weeks after TT-1
TT-Booster Tetanus After 2 doses of TT have been received in the last 36 weeks during a pregnancy

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Immunization Schedule for Children

The vaccinations are given again when the newborns reach the age of two years to keep the protection that was acquired from the initial doses. This has a positive impact on the children’s immunity. The following is the immunization schedule for children.

Vaccine Disease When to Administer
DPT Booster-1 Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus 16 to 24 Months
MMR-2 Measles, Mumps and Rubella 16 to 24 Months
OPV Booster Polio 16 to 24 Months
JE-2 Japanese Encephalitis 16 to 24 Months
Vitamin A (2nd to 9th Dose) Measles and Supplementation 16 to 18 Months. Then one dose is given every six months till the age of five years.
DPT Booster-2 Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus 5 to 6 Years
TT Tetanus 10 Years and 16 Years

Conclusion

It is a myth that getting immunizations for your child will result in autism. There is no link between vaccination and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Getting immunizations as a child can help your child avoid serious diseases like measles, mumps, rubella (chickenpox), polio, and pneumococcal disease.

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Immunization  FAQ’S

What are the types of immunizations?

The creation of vaccines is done using two different forms of immunization. Active and passive immunization are two types of immunization. The article above has more information about them.

What is the immunization for pregnant women?

Tetanus virus can cross the placenta and harm a developing fetus, so pregnant ladies should receive the vaccination doses. When a baby is born, this may cause the condition to develop.

When should I start the vaccination of my baby?

Within the first 24 hours of their birth, the baby should receive their first dose of Hepatitis B virus vaccination. Within 15 days of their birth, they will also receive the first dose of polio vaccine.

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